Go big or go home…

Posts Tagged ‘chinese new year

I went to my company’s Chinese New Year dinner on Monday. This involved lots of fish as the Chinese word for this, ‘yu’, sounds the same as the words for wish and abundance. Hence including fish ensures an abundant new year.

The second course is usually shark fin soup. Shark = fish = an abundance of wealth, so it’s an important part of the dinner. It’s also expensive, which I think has a two-fold effect. Firstly, there is the idea that you need to spend money to make money, so pricey ingredients mean more fortune to come. But I don’t think it’s too mean to suggest there’s also a sense of keeping up with the Joneses. No one wants his or her dinner to look cheap.

So, sharks are firmly on the menu. Sadly they’re on some other lists as well, including one made by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). They are also apex predators, which means removing them from the food chain is more disruptive than removing something lower down. And the way they are caught and butchered is more cruel than other hunting and processing methods.

Now, I have a pretty liberal policy about what I’ll put in my mouth, but I draw the line at anything endangered (which is a shame, clouded leopards look hella tasty). When the soup was served on Monday I politely declined, explaining that eating it would go against my principles.

I didn’t lecture anyone else, not even the girl who said, “I hope it isn’t shark, I’m just going to eat it and not ask,” but I still faced an awful lot of arguments. This long preamble is leading to the point where I address those arguments, in ascending order of relevance.

Q. Just try it, you might like it.
A. I’m sure it’s very tasty, that’s not my concern.

Q. It’s probably mock shark, so it’s fine.
A. Given that my stand is a small one that won’t directly save any sharks, I’d rather stick to the principle than debate the minutiae of what’s actually in the bowl.

Q. I wouldn’t kill one myself, but this one’s already dead so it’s fine.
A. Someone actually said this. Hands up who’s eaten anything they caught and killed themselves. No… thought not. And to take the argument to its absurd conclusion, how about “I wouldn’t take babies and put them on spikes myself, but if someone did it for me it would be fine.”

Q. [More sensible version of the previous argument] This one is already dead, so it’s a waste/it died in vain if you don’t eat it.
A. Saying “But this one’s already dead,” is an attempt to move guilt or blame higher up the pathway: it’s the fisherman’s fault; the fishmonger’s fault; the restaurant’s fault. It’s not my fault, oh no. I am a passive actor in my own life, not responsible for the things that I move from a bowl into my mouth.

It might seem like rejecting one bowl of soup in a restaurant is a pointless, hopeless gesture that will go unnoticed, and I acknowledge that my stand is partly to assuage my conscious. But small actions do add up.

Product supply and demand changes constantly and consumers undeniably drive market trends. Maybe not quickly, and in the case of shark fin fishermen will fight while it’s still economically viable to do so, but so will restaurants. They usually have brutal profit margins, if they’re chucking away soup they’ll damned well order less ingredients next time.

So those are a few sensible answers to pro-shark fin arguments, but this is my real answer:

Dead finned scalloped hammerhead. Courtesy of Jeff Rotman/jeffrotman.com

I mentioned cruel hunting methods above. By far the most commercially valuable part of a shark is its fin, so often rather than take the whole bulky animal ashore the shark is ‘finned’. Fishermen cut off and keep the small, viable part and throw the live animal back into the sea to die a slow, suffocating death. And that makes me too sad to eat the things.

Plus how much would it suck to know I played a part in wiping out one of the oldest continuously extant species on the planet?

Gong xi fa cai!

Image from here, can’t find the source I’m afraid. And here is a Guardian photo article about shark’s fin soup [click the images to navigate forwards].

Edited to add:
I’ve just realised, by bothering to look at the file name, that the photograph above was taken by someone called Jeff Rotman. There are some beautiful images up on his site.

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Safe and sound and excited about the start of our new life, and the year of the ox.

Gong xi fa cai

Gong xi fa cai

Love you all!

J & L

xx